2016 Honda CRF range launched

Japanese motorcycle giant Honda has revealed their motocross range. The CRF250R and CRF450R all have been upgraded for 2016.

The 2016 CRF250R comes with a new cylinder head porting, a lighter piston and a redesigned connecting-rod. Power has been increased by 1.8 hp although the engine is the same 249cc single cylinder with a 76.8mm bore and 53.8mm stroke.

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The 2016 version has 39.4 hp at 11,500 rpm while torque level has been slightly incresead up to 27 Nm at 9,000 rpm (26 Nm on previous model). Honda increased cam lift and made modifications to the exhaust system. The steel exhaust valves have been replaced with titanium ones, the outlet diameters are larger and header pipe resonator is now new. Compression ratio is now 13.8:1 compared to 13.5:1 on the 2015 CRF250R.

The updates don’t end here. Honda equipped the bike with a new fuel injection system. The suspension is revised. So, the 2016 Honda CRF250R’s fork has been increased by 5 mm. The SFF-TAC Showa Air Fork outer cylinder chamber receives 80kPa of air pressure from 0 kPa. Damping adjustment is wider, 8 settings being available compared to just 4 on the previous model.

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Unfortunately, the bigger bike, 2016 Honda CRF450R, is equipped with the same engine found on the previous model. The engine mapping is also the same, the 449 cc single engine producing 53 hp at 9,000 rpm and  47.9 Nm of torque.

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The 2016 CRF450R features an improved suspension. The KYB Pneumatic Spring Fork has more rigidity thanks to the outer tube. The fork is 5mm longer compared to the previous version. Just like its 250 cc sibling, the 2016 CRF450R brings a wider number of compression and rebound adjustments, 8 compared to 4 on the 2015 bike. The rear KYB shock features in the middle-upper range more rebound damping while the Pro-Link ratio is brand new.

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Foto: blog.motorcycle.com

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